NZ shootings: Terrorist sent manifesto to 70 individuals, institutions worldwide

Leroy Wright
March 17, 2019

A Candelit Prayer is held outside the State Library of Victoria on March 16, 2019 in Melbourne, Australia; 49 people are confirmed dead, with with 36 injured still in hospital following shooting attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand on Friday, 15 March at the hands of suspected shooter Brenton Tarrant.

The Prime Minister said the advice she had received from police indicated that the timing of the email and the information it contained did not provide enough time for response.

The tragic attack saw 41 people killed at the Masjid Al Noor mosque in central Christchurch, whilst seven others were killed at the suburban Linwood Masjid Mosque, and one person died later at Christchurch Hospital.

The death toll of the Christchurch terror attacks has risen to 50, and two injured victims remained in critical condition, Police Commissioner Mike Bush said Sunday morning.

The police initially said that four people had been detained in the wake of the attacks.

"As soon as New Zealanders hear that someone was legally able to acquire, as I'm advised, those weapons and carry out this event, that will raise enormous questions with our gun laws, and that is why we will respond swiftly", she explained.

"But that arrest was tangential to this matter and we do not believe that he was involved in this attack either", he said.

Police Association President Chris Cahill backed tighter gun laws, saying the weapons used in the mosque shootings were banned in Australia after the Port Arthur massacre in 1996 in which 35 people were gunned down.

Footage of the attack on one of the mosques was broadcast live on Facebook, and a "manifesto" was also posted online that denounced immigrants as "invaders". "Just helping people is his main thing".

Furthermore, a circular was released by the foreign ministry notifying details regarding visa facilitation for the immediate family members of the Pakistani victims.

Trump slams handling of Brexit by UK's May
The US president also discussed Varadkar's reputation in Ireland and said that: "The people love him - that's very important". Trump also lamented he was "surprised at how badly it has all gone from the standpoint of negotiating".

Director-General of the Pacific Community (SPC) Colin Tukuitonga also showed his support for New Zealand and those who lost loved ones.

"Any loss of life at the hands of extremists regardless of religion, race or colour should be condemned in the strongest of terms". Until Friday, the country's worst mass shooting was in 1990, when a lone gunman killed 13 people in the small town of Aramoana.

Leaders around the world expressed sorrow and disgust at the attacks, with some deploring the demonisation of Muslims.

Pacific Islands Forum Chair and president of Nauru Baron Waqa expressed his "deepest condolences" to the people and government of New Zealand on what he called a sad day for Christchurch and a sad day for the region.

Ardern said she had spoken with Trump, who asked how he could help.

Mohammad Imran Khan, a 47-year-old man who owned two restaurants in Christchurch died in the Lynwood mosque.

Moreover, Pakistan's High Commissioner and Deputy High Commissioner in New Zealand would also be available for guidance, round the clock, the press release said.

He also reached out to the Muslim community in Christchurch and in New Zealand.

"This act of terror was brought to our shores and rained down upon us".

Other reports by

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER