Jaw-dropping images of Hurricane Florence from space

Cristina Cross
September 13, 2018

"While some weakening is expected to begin by late Thursday, Florence is still forecast to be an extremely risky major hurricane when it nears the USA coast on Friday", the NHC said in an 11 a.m.

Alexander Gerst, a German astronaut orbiting Earth from 250 miles up, has a warning for humans on the planet below him.

"This is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you", he added.

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst tweeted pictures taken 249 miles above the eye of the storm.

Meanwhile, NASA's Aqua satellite snapped an infrared image of Hurricane Florence on September 11, at 2:30 a.m. EDT.

"#HurricaneFlorence this morning with Cape Hatteras #NorthCarolina in the foreground", Arnold wrote this morning.

"The crew of @Space_Station is thinking of those who will be affected", Arnold said in a tweet.

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And here is video from inside Hurricane Florence.

The 400-mile wide hurricane reached Category 4 strength on Monday and was expected to continue to strengthen as it approaches the United States and the coast of the Carolinas and Virginia, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The weather agency also warned "life-threatening freshwater flooding is likely from a prolonged and exceptionally heavy rainfall event".

According to the forecast of meteorologists from the National centre for monitoring hurricanes, the US, South-East mainland territory of the country hurricane Florence will arrive on Thursday, September 13, and will hit the coast with wind speed above 230 km/h.

And even from space, Hurricane Florence looks terrifying.

In addition to the wide shots, some of Gerst's photos are zoomed-in views showing a look nearly directly down into Florence's giant eye.

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