Trump’s Supreme Court nominee to have confirmation hearing September 4

Leroy Wright
August 13, 2018

That scheduling tees up the GOP to meet its goal of getting President Donald Trump's pick seated on the high court by the time its term begins in early October, barring unforeseen obstacles or a breakthrough by Democrats who are pushing to derail Kavanaugh's confirmation. Democrats have warned that Kavanaugh may be unwilling to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible coordination between President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign and Russian Federation.

They show that Kavanaugh drafted an "Overall Plan" to colleagues in 1998 providing his thoughts on bringing the independent counsel office's work to a close.

Kavanaugh once helped write the Starr Report, which outlined broad grounds on which to impeach President Clinton for his role in the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

Grassley said he expects the hearing to last three or four days, CNN reported. "He'll get confirmed. It won't be a landslide, but he'll get confirmed". Opening statements will take place on September 4, and the Senators will begin questioning Kavanaugh the following day. Testimony by those who know Judge Kavanaugh the best, outside legal experts, and the American Bar Association is expected to follow.

The California Democrat has already indicated on multiple occasions that she will vote against Kavanaugh, tweeting just minutues after his nomination was announced that she "will oppose his nomination to the Supreme Court" because Kavanaugh "represents a direct and fundamental threat to the rights and health care of hundreds of millions of Americans".

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President Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan appear in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on May 16, 2017. Erdogan said high foreign exchange rates were being used as a weapon against Turkey.

July 31: Senate Judiciary Democrats request all available documents from Brett Kavanaugh's time in the White House (2001-2006).

"During his time in the Bush White House, Brett Kavanaugh nearly certainly was involved with numerous legal and policy issues that impact the lives and rights of LGBTQ people, including hate crimes legislation, non-discrimination protections for federal workers, and a proposed Constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage in every state", said HRC Associate Legal Director Robin Maril.

No committee hearings for Kavanaugh have been announced yet. Meanwhile, most of the White House records related to Kavanaugh are being held on a "committee confidential" basis, with just 5,700 pages from his White House years released this week to the public. At this current pace, we have plenty of time to review the rest of emails and other records that we will receive from President Bush and the National Archives.

The coalition letters, organized by Open the Government, come on the heels of similar letters from Schumer and Judiciary Committee Democrats.

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