Where to watch meteor shower in UAE next week

Cristina Cross
August 10, 2018

On Sunday night (Aug. 12) and into early Monday morning (Aug. 13), Earth will push through the densest band of the Swift-Tuttle debris cloud that our planet has access to. The comet is the largest object known to repeatedly careen by earth, with a nucleus of 16 miles wide. This year's Perseid meteor shower will be highly visible both Saturday and Sunday night, giving watchers ample opportunity to spot plenty of shooting stars.

The Perseids are named after the constellation Perseus because that's where the point from which they appear to originate, called the radiant, is located.

It last greeted us in 1992 and will next pass in 2126, but we travel through the comet's dust every year, making the Perseid Meteor Shower an annual event.

The Perseids, one of the best meteor showers of the year, will peak this weekend, and depending where you are the viewing conditions could be great.

Such an adjustment occurs every 11 years or so, when Jupiter makes its closest approach to the Swift-Tuttle debris cloud, at a distance of about 160 million miles (257 million kilometers).

To make the best of the meteors, observers should avoid built-up areas and try to find an unobstructed view to the east.

"It will be a crescent, which means it will set before the Perseid show gets underway after midnight", NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke told Space.com.

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Although the shower peaks on August 12, you'll be able to see a good deal of shooting stars all weekend and into Monday.

Why is it considered the best of the year?

With a new moon providing an extra-dark backdrop to the spectacle, the shooting stars will be brighter than ever.

As the particles, ranging in size from a grain of sand to a pea, hit the Earth's atmosphere at 37 miles per second, they burn up and streak across the sky. During that optimum period you could see between 60 and 100 meteors per hour.

"If you have seen a few of them you have seen them all", he said.

Remember it takes your eyes about 30 minutes to fully adjust to the dark, and don't worry about acquiring any fancy equipment - you'll be able to see everything easily with the naked eye, especially if you can get out of the city and away from the smog and light pollution.

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