In the Netherlands during the experiment with viagra died 11 babies

Pearl Mccarthy
July 28, 2018

A Dutch medical trial has been halted after the deaths of 11 babies whose mothers were given Viagra as part of a study aimed at helping unborn infants grow.

The AMC said in a statement that the likelihood of lung blood vessel damage "appears to be greater and the chance of death after birth seems to have increased", reports SBS. "All participants were approached personally and nearly everyone was informed and know by now whether they have taken the drug or the placebo".

The original version of this story misstated the drug involved in the study. "All the women concerned are accompanied to the extent possible by the doctors involved in the study". There is no known therapy to help these babies grow, and their prognosis was considered poor.

The hope, backed up by experimental research on rats, had been that the drug would encourage a better flow of blood through the placenta, promoting the growth of the child.

She has no concerns for the participants of a New Zealand and Australian trial. However, the Dutch study was investigator-initiated, and Pfizer has no involvement in the trial, a Pfizer spokesperson told us.

In total, 93 women were given sildenafil and 90 were given a dummy drug or placebo. It can lead to stillbirth or neonatal death, and babies that survive are still at higher risk for infections and often suffer from long-term problems such as obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Three of the women in the control group (n=90) also had babies who developed the same lung problems, but none have died from any condition which could be related to sildenafil.

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The study involving the UMC and 10 other Dutch hospitals was launched in 2015 focusing on women whose babies developed poorly in early pregnancy, the Amsterdam hospital said.

In the Queensland study, the drug was used over a significantly shorter time frame and for different reasons.

(In total, there were 19 deaths in the treatment group versus nine in the placebo group-the latter not being a surprise given all the fetuses were at high risk due to their poor growth.) "It took us very little time to make the decision to halt the study", Ganzevoort says. But the opposite happened.

"The last thing you want to do is harm patients".

The researchers say they will continue to analyze the data and closely monitor the children in the study.

He revealed the results had also been shared with Canadian researchers working on similar trials. "For the mothers, the drug had no adverse effect", a spokesperson told us.

But last week the trial was terminated when an independent committee overseeing the research found that more babies than expected were being born with lung problems.

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