Octopus that predicted Japan's World Cup fate gets sent to dinner table

Heather Diaz
July 7, 2018

Rabiot made his predictions by swimming in a pool and moving towards one of three baskets labelled with Japan, their opponent and a draw.

But his spirit will live on, as the fisherman plans to use another octopus to predict the results of future fixtures. Despite losing to the Poles, Japan advanced courtesy of the fact that its players had received fewer cautions during the three group stage games.

"I hope Rabiot's successor will accurately tip the results of all games and Japan will win the World Cup".

However, Kimio Abe, who caught the animal, revealed it had since been taken to market, where it was sold and turned into seafood, reports the Independent.

In 2010, Paul the octopus became an worldwide star after correctly predicting the results of all Germany's games in the 2010 World Cup, as well as the final - in which it backed Spain to win. But sadly, this particular career was about to be tragically cut short.

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However, it is definitely coming back at some unplanned point in the future, and we know what it will look like when it does. Another adds: "Yeah, it would be cool to be able to save some of these maps so they can be used again".

Abe told Mainichi that he sent Rabiot to the fish market before Japan lost 1-0 to Poland last week, an outcome the tasty invertebrate didn't see coming.

By now, you probably know that this did not exactly go to plan.

Japan will face title-contenders Belgium on Monday - and although this World Cup has been one of surprises, perhaps getting slaughtered was Rabiot's way of predicting the outcome of the match.

Apparently being psychic doesn't save an animal from becoming food on the table. Rabiot's 100 per cent record also tops fellow psychic World Cup star Achilles the deaf Russian cat, who wrongly predicted a Nigeria win over Argentina in the group stages. Japan lose their next game in heartbreaking fashion.

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