Five people die in United States romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak

Pearl Mccarthy
June 2, 2018

In addition, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated the case count: 197 people from 35 states were sickened.

Four more deaths have been linked to a national food poisoning outbreak blamed on tainted Arizona-grown romaine lettuce, bringing the total to five.

In the spring, the CDC linked the outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in and around Yuma, Arizona.

Most new cases involve people who became sick two or three weeks ago, when the tainted lettuce was still available for sale. Three more states have reported ill people - Arkansas, North Carolina and Oklahoma. On Friday, health officials said they had learned of four more - one in Arkansas, one in NY, and two in Minnesota. In a June 1 advisory, the agency said that four additional deaths were reported in Arkansas, North Carolina and NY in addition to the original death in California. On Friday, health officials said they had learned of four more - one in Arkansas, one in NY, and two in Minnesota. While almost 90 percent of those who fell ill reported eating romaine lettuce in the week before they were sickened, some told the CDC that they did not personally eat the lettuce but were in close contact with somebody who did. The growing season in the Yuma, Ariz. region, which produced the contaminated lettuce, ended April 16. Some said they did not eat romaine lettuce but were in close contact with someone who got sick after eating it.

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Eating the contaminated lettuce may cause diarrhea, vomiting and even kidney failure in severe cases.

Most people recover within a week, but some illnesses can last longer and be more severe.

The recent E. coli outbreak is the most severe to hit the US since 2006, when three people died in an outbreak linked to uncooked spinach.

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